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Thread: UFS basics, The Backswing

  1. #1
    Regular Member toysoldyours's Avatar
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    UFS basics, The Backswing

    Hey all. With the number of new players increasing, i thought id start putting out some basic strat guides for ufs. It might help with the sometimes painful learning curve this game can have. Also, our articles section on the forums is pretty hurtin. We need to get some content in there.

    So Backswing is a term used in Ufs, that refers the idea of performing a kill turn after an opponent over extends, typically from attempting a kill turn themselves. Its one of the basic strategies of ufs and helps you to gain a better understanding of the overall eb and flow of the game.

    At its base, its a simple concept. Wait for them to not manage a kill, then you yourself get the kill. But in actuality its more complicated than that. If your not prepared, you won't ever get the oppertunity to attempt a backswing because the opp has prepared better, or is playing a hyper aggresive character. Maybe you get the oppertunity but you dont have any attacks to backswing with. The backswing is just one of many strategies to win with, and like any good tactic, it needs planning.

    The set up. The first thing you need, is a plan of survival. The backswing relies on getting your opp to over extend as much as possible. This can be as simple as pretending you cant block by eating a few hits then dropping a templar/winners never quit/ whatever at the last minute. Blocking too early lets the opp calculate what your capability is early on in the turn and gives them a chance to rethink plays. Alternatively it could just be a grey wall that bogs down kill turns and absorbs the atks for you. This only really works if your outbuilding them.

    The second thing you need is a plan of return. Eating atks to keep your own atks from being used as blocks is the most basic way to do this. Other ways include setting up fetch mechanics to grab attacks at will, or just plain ol reversals. Fetch mechanics are solid way to ensure the cards you need when you need them. (*note: examples are going to stick to as many nonUR nonchamp cards as possible) Cards that scoop from from momentum are great for this (Hakkeshu of death,Confine). It takes some memory sometimes to remeber your momentum order, but it can work wonders. Some cards can scoop up more cards from the grave (Etincelles, Headcrush) while others just give you plain ol card draw for a chance to see more orange cards (rising tackle, danken, tiger kick). There are other odd ones in there as well that can grab cards from who knows where (shopaholic+maxima atks, cunning and prideful). Whatver your plan of return, make sure you have one to take advantage of an opp with their guard down.


    ****NOTES FROM OTHERS*****
    these can be found further down the thread, but if your just checkin the article, these are important things to note.

    Wafflecopter made a strong point in prioritizing dmg over both spd/stun when it comes to designing a backswing plan. This is very true. Where as stun and speed are great, they are less tools of the backswing, and more so tools of a regular kill turn push. ( article to come later)

    also cetonis added this very good nugget:
    Quote Originally Posted by Cetonis View Post
    I'd like to add for the new players - even if this kind of play isn't really your cup of tea (don't worry, it's not mine either), you absolutely must to be able to recognize when your opponent is pursuing this gameplan and be ready to counterplay as necessary.

    Sometimes that means taking a low-commitment free hit every turn if they're giving it to you, sometimes it means beating them at their own game and crafting a board and hand they can't actually stop, sometimes you can get some mileage by going in "halfway" and making them burn some resource, etc.

    If it sounds tricky to know what buttons to push when, that's because it can be. Moreover, different decks will be better or worse at the various options. But, if the opponent has gotten themselves stuck needing a backswing opportunity in order to win, you have the advantage so long as you can remain calm and not try anything stupid.

    A number of top players will run decks that can set up the big backswing as plan A or B, because of the frequency with which less experienced or skilled players will walk into it or otherwise get caught in between not knowing what they want to do. When well-executed, it can be a fairly reliable way to put up positive swiss records and make some top cuts. So definitely expect to run into this at majors even if you don't much care for the style yourself.


    I hope this helped some folks out. Theres a good chance i missed something. If so, please chime in. Till next time.
    Last edited by toysoldyours; 04-24-2014 at 08:39 PM. Reason: Added content from others
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Shinguyi's Avatar
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    A very good underrated card for recursion is A Heavenly Match. Although it grabs difficulty 3 or less mid and high attacks, the card itself acts as a 4 check attack with a block. Best of all, you never have to worry it clogging your card pool because it removes itself as a cost; meaning that if your opponent cancels it, it will still remove itself and you made your opponent lose resources.

    There are a lot of nice recursion cards that are not UR or promo. They are just easily overshadowed by the chase cards.

    Nice article!

  3. #3
    Senior Member wafflecopter's Avatar
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    Nice writeup, I definitely agree that more stuff about the fundamentals of the game could be really helpful to people starting out. Honestly though I don't think I agree with what you say about the value of speed and Stun. In a normal kill turn where you're going in dry, those can be very valuable in forcing your opponent to commit out or fail blocks. But when they overextend, they're comparatively much less important; it's more valuable to ensure that your damage count is high enough (of course, taking into account their board and probable hand). Like, yeah, you can Stun down their last defensive pieces, but if their board is 2 Breakfasts would you rather draw Zi Mei's Wheel Kick or Divine Tribulation? :P

    I feel like there's an important article to be written about patience, grey walls and the idea of a "kill turn" -- basically I wonder how many people might read this and be like, "backswing? Are you saying my opponent doesn't attack me EVERY turn?" Nonetheless, good job writing this, lots of non-obvious bits of wisdom.
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    Regular Member toysoldyours's Avatar
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    That's a good point waffle. I always think about chasm buster when I think stun. Chasm is a great way to open a kill turn. But I suppose that supports your other point. That starts to go into kill turns more so than backswings. I'll edit the post a bit when I get home. Anybody else have any points to add in?
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Cetonis's Avatar
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    I find a certain irony in the fact that you're the one writing this and not some other guy from Calgary :P

    But I'd like to add for the new players - even if this kind of play isn't really your cup of tea (don't worry, it's not mine either), you absolutely must to be able to recognize when your opponent is pursuing this gameplan and be ready to counterplay as necessary.

    Sometimes that means taking a low-commitment free hit every turn if they're giving it to you, sometimes it means beating them at their own game and crafting a board and hand they can't actually stop, sometimes you can get some mileage by going in "halfway" and making them burn some resource, etc.

    If it sounds tricky to know what buttons to push when, that's because it can be. Moreover, different decks will be better or worse at the various options. But, if the opponent has gotten themselves stuck needing a backswing opportunity in order to win, you have the advantage so long as you can remain calm and not try anything stupid.

    A number of top players will run decks that can set up the big backswing as plan A or B, because of the frequency with which less experienced or skilled players will walk into it or otherwise get caught in between not knowing what they want to do. When well-executed, it can be a fairly reliable way to put up positive swiss records and make some top cuts. So definitely expect to run into this at majors even if you don't much care for the style yourself.

  6. #6
    Senior Member dutpotd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cetonis View Post
    I find a certain irony in the fact that you're the one writing this and not some other guy from Calgary :P
    I find it ironic that he knows all this and still loses to me all the time, some of this stuff I don't even know about

    Kidding Kevin, good article.
    "No, no, not by the hair on my chinny chin Chin."

  7. #7
    Regular Member toysoldyours's Avatar
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    oh god. its cause you do it to me sooo much. nothing improves your game like getting run over by dut a few dozen times :S
    My YouTube channel with videos for new players.
    New vids are like... 2 a year cause I'm lazy

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