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Thread: Card evaluation

  1. #1
    Regular Member toysoldyours's Avatar
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    Card evaluation

    I'm posting this so I can link it for people.

    The whole write up is in regards to why you run 1x of some cards in UFS. And why some cards are 4x staple etc.


    Writing this up for the new folks.

    The idea behind running 1 copy of something over 4 copies over 2 or 3, is almost always a matter of cascading value, or depreciating value.

    In foundations, the easiest example is unique foundations, where the second copy is almost always useless. Because you can't have 2 of them out at the same time. An arguement can be made to running a second copy of the card has an alternate use (like a block) or if you really want to see that card during the game.

    With other foundations. It depends on how much value is gained or lost , per additional copy. Egotistical for example, draws you card after you take damage, but only if you haven't drawn a card yet that turn. At 1 copy, it holds maximum value. A second copy drops drastically, only being useful if the first copies effect got canceled. And a third copy becomes almost completely redundant. Add in the fact that it doesn't block, egotistical becomes a prime example of a 1x card.

    Bridging the races is a great 4x example. At a +2 block and 1dif, it already has solid playable numbers for a cheap foundation. But the real winner, is that every copy you get out, can trigger its Response off of the same event. Meaning 1 event can trigger 4 responses. The same usually goes with any card that can piggyback onto other copies of itself, during the same window. An example being 'my beautiful face is ruined' being able to all trigger on a single attack once at desperation. Unlike robot masters, that can't proc multiple times per attack very easily.

    With attacks and actions. You have to ask more questions. Like. Do I want to see this early? Do I want to see it often/every turn? How effective is it played back to back in pairs? Does it get stronger in pairs? Does it get weaker?

    Death blow is great late game, when you get momentum to fuel it. But early, it's not that great. No block, less likely to have momentum for it, and on top of that, it's not great used in pairs due to the enormous momentum requirements. Also, 5 difficulty doesn't make it easy to play. So 1-2 copies is ideal.

    Double knee press however . Has a great block for early protection, has a low cost for easy play, scales well into late game, and its effect makes it great to play in multiple copies. So you can easily play 4 copies.

    Actions are similar. Just ask all the same questions and try to imagine how functional they are in different situations.

    TLDR: always try to minimize the chance of something being dead in hand. You never want to review a non block finisher attack turn 1, only to draw it again. Reducing copies of said card prevents these situations and keeps you in control of what you draw.

    You might be less likely to see your glorious kill combo when you want it, but you'll also die a lot less when you don't want to. It's easier to wait an extra turn to kill someone than it is to convince your opponent to wait a turn to kill you.


    BONUS: the benefit of running high card count decks is that it gives you the option of waiting someone out. If you ever reach a stalemate where both players can't break the others wall. The larger deck holds the advantage, being able to build more aggressively and forcing the opponent to have to attack into your wall fearing being decked out.

    The key to building effectively at higher counts, is to just do your math. Find out what percentage of attack/block/speed hate/ whatever you run, and apply that to the larger numbered deck, and adjust. It's also a good habit to learn effects that are similar. Example - run 4 reactive style and 4 know your objective. But add in 2 kleptomaniac for the 5-6 copies of momentum hate and speed hate.
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  2. #2
    Regular Member 'Caz Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toysoldyours View Post
    You never want to review a non block finisher attack turn 1, only to draw it again. Reducing copies of said card prevents these situations and keeps you in control of what you draw.
    Attacks are for attacking, you scrub.
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  3. #3
    Scout PvtChurch's Avatar
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    Raptor needs Ultimate Undead to feel useful, so you run 4 of it. Simple, problem solved. It's simple math, you scrub.

  4. #4
    Regular Member 'Caz Simon's Avatar
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    Ultimate Undead has a block on it, which is 80% of the reason it doesn't suck.

    The other 20% is that the block on it is high.
    Proud innovator of the Calgary Happy Feet meta
    2014 UK Teams Champ
    2015 Wheelie-bin Phil Birch diversity champ
    2016 World Teams Champ
    My hobbies include Saiki-ing on kids, and E Destroying all the things.

  5. #5
    This is a solid topic with good insight for newer players. Way to contribute to the community, you scrub.
    ~Learn your rules, you better learn your rules,
    If you don't, you'll be eaten in your sleep~


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